Public Dialogues

Agrarian reforms and transformation of agriculture in Uganda

  1. What is agrarian reform?

There are two common definitions of agrarian reform.

  1. Government-initiated or government-backed redistribution of agricultural land (land reform).
  2. An overall redirection of the agrarian system of the country, which often includes land reform measures. This kind of reform includes credit measures, training, extension, land consolidations, etc. The World Bank five dimensions of agrarian reform (1) land reform, (2) price and market liberalization, (3) agro-processing and input supply channels, (4) rural finance, (5) market institutions (Csaki and Nash, 1998).
    1. What is agrarian reform?

    There are two common definitions of agrarian reform.

    1. Government-initiated or government-backed redistribution of agricultural land (land reform).
    2. An overall redirection of the agrarian system of the country, which often includes land reform measures. This kind of reform includes credit measures, training, extension, land consolidations, etc. The World Bank five dimensions of agrarian reform (1) land reform, (2) price and market liberalization, (3) agro-processing and input supply channels, (4) rural finance, (5) market institutions (Csaki and Nash, 1998).

 

  Agrarian reforms and transformation of agriculture in Uganda

Interpreting the Developmental Powers and Functions of District Councils in Uganda

Introduction

The sharing of power and functions between the central government and local governments is a cornerstone of a good decentralised system, and an expression of developmental and democratic autonomy.[1] It is argued that local governments should be vested with clear functions.

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Land Use Policy

Introduction

Our economy since independence (1962) became increasingly dependent on foreign loans and aid and we eventually became and heavily indebted country some of whose debts had to be forgiven. In the process we lost the independence to make policy. This role was taken over, especially from the early 1980s, by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Their Structural Adjustment Programme demanded Liberalization, Privatization and Freeing of the Market1 

Land Use Policy

Involvement of Military Personnel in Agricultural Extension Services: Implications for Uptake of Emerging Technologies

Introduction

There seems to be general consensus that NAADS and the entire agriculture sector has not done well despite the huge amounts of money injected into it. Question is which sector has done well other than the Army? Are the reasons for poor performance, therefore, known and are they unique to the agricultural sector or general to the whole government?

NAADS

Need for Development of Agricultural Value Chains that Benefit Small Holder Farmers

The world population in 2050 will be 9 Billion and each day, a quarter of a million people are added. People are growing richer, demanding more and better food, thus increasing pressure on farmland. At the same time, farmland is being lost, to urbanization and erosion – over the past 150 years, half of the planet's top soil has been lost. Food demand will continue increasing while production will struggle to keep up, creating the risk of price increases and a certainty of high price volatility.

Small Scale Farming

 

Financing higher Education in Uganda: Case of Public Universities

This paper has been processed within the thematic framework of “Financing higher education” The thematic framework is located within a wider debate of “Accountability and performance management in public higher education within the context of the so-called the ‘New Public Management” (NPM) paradigm recently embraced by different countries in both developed and developing world including Uganda.

Financing Higher Education